Letters to the editor

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Sickening sight

While walking on the eastern end of Oxbow Rd (courtesy of the landowners) on March 13, I was met by a sickening sight. The farm field below was covered in thousands, if not tens of thousands, of pieces of plastic. This farm land surrounds the Brantford landfill on the outside of the flood protection dike. The plastic obviously had been blown out of the dump. There was even plastic on the other side of the Grand River stuck on some of the trees high up on the bank close to where I was walking. I shudder to think how much plastic had blown into the river to be carried downstream to Lake Erie or to become entangled in shoreline vegetation downstream with the current high water. I had noticed plastic in the fields surrounding the landfill earlier this winter but it is now completely unacceptable.

The city owns the landfill and is therefore responsible for this cleanup. Wind-blown plastic escaping a landfill is an obvious problem, and high screens are necessary to prevent this from happening, as well as other mitigation measures. The administrators of this dump are apparently not up to the task of preventing this problem.

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I think with this kind of management the best solution is perhaps to close the landfill and truck Brantford’s waste to other landfills where the operators are better able keep the waste in the landfill.

Bill Lamond,
Brantford

Vaccine hesitancy

Recent U.S. data shows there is considerable reluctance among frontline health-care workers to getting a COVID-19 shot.

According to a Gallup survey done in December, over 51 per cent of the health-care workers and first-responders polled were not convinced that vaccinations would be helpful.

Such frontline worker skepticism is reflected by a Dec. 31 report in the Los Angeles Times. In California, over half of the workers in Tehama County’s St. Elizabeth Community Hospital, an estimated 50 per cent of the frontline workers in Riverside County, and 20 to 40 per cent in L.A. County refused the vaccine when it was offered.

In Ohio, Gov. Mike DeWine reported that 60 per cent of nursing home workers refused the vaccine. In Texas, the Texan Tribune reported in February that many home health-care workers are refusing to be vaccinated.

A CDC survey of skilled-nursing facilities published in early February found that fewer than 40 per cent of the staff took at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

The situation is similar in other countries. In Canada, for example, according to an anecdotal CTV report, many long-term-care workers in Montreal are “flat-out refusing” to be inoculated.

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According to a Feb. 18 article in the Wall Street Journal, thousands of health workers in Europe refuse to take one of the three available COVID-19 vaccines because of concerns over efficacy and side-effects.

I find such results startling in their implications because frontline workers are people who have every incentive to protect themselves. It appears many of them prefer to rely on their own bodies’ immune system rather than take a chance with a fast-tracked vaccine.

Werner Broschinski
Princeton

Mind-boggling

Why do the mayor and city councilors want to spend millions to build a new park on the Arrowdale property, with the cost to be repaid through property taxes? This is an unnecessary expense, especially during the financially challenging times of a pandemic. It’s mind-boggling how they can even think of justifying pushing this through.

Just let Arrowdale, which is already a beautiful green space, open again this season so it can actually produce revenue for the city.

Save Arrowdale for future generations to enjoy.

Diane Forbes
Brantford

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